Abstract

After visual adaptation with a white–black pulse train, either flickering at 1 Hz or apparently fused at 50 Hz, chromatic lights appear differently colored and white lights appear differentially bright. The results imply a neural interaction between achromatic and chromatic channels. They also support the hypothesis that the adaptive effects of flicker are less than those for equal quanta-catch fused stimulation but suggest that the hypothesis is valid only for the achromatic mechanism.

© 1982 Optical Society of America

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