Abstract

The chromaticity of an element in any visual scene is established with minimum power input to the eye when light from the element is composed of a mixture of spectral colors near 450, 540, and 610 nm. In white light, these are chromatically the most effective wavelengths for color discrimination of illuminated objects. Least-effective wavelengths are near 500 and 580 nm; these are shown to be harmful in the sense of causing confusion. Various experiments indicate that three-color response of human vision consists of well-separated channels peaking near 450, 540, and 610 nm. This response is related to the color-matching functions of the 1931 CIE Standard Observer and to brightness per watt of spectral colors.

© 1972 Optical Society of America

Full Article  |  PDF Article
OSA Recommended Articles
Luminosity and Color-Rendering Capability of White Light

W. A. Thornton
J. Opt. Soc. Am. 61(9) 1155-1163 (1971)

Heterochromatic additivity, foveal spectral sensitivity, and a new color model*

Sherman L. Guth and Howard R. Lodge
J. Opt. Soc. Am. 63(4) 450-462 (1973)

References

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Citation lists with outbound citation links are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Cited By

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Cited by links are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Figures (5)

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Figure files are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription