Abstract

We previously proposed a photonics-electronics convergence system to solve bandwidth bottleneck problems among large-scale integrations (LSIs) and demonstrated a high bandwidth density with silicon optical interposers at room temperature. For practical applications, the interposers should be usable under high-temperature conditions or rapid temperature changes so that they can cope with the heat generated by the mounted LSIs. We designed and fabricated athermal silicon optical interposers integrated with temperature-insensitive components on a silicon substrate. An arrayed laser diode (LD) chip was a flip-chip bonded to the substrate. Each LD had multiple quantum dot layers with a 1.3-μm lasing wavelength. The output power was higher than 10 mW per channel up to 100 °C. Silicon optical modulator and germanium photodetector (PD) arrays were monolithically integrated on the substrate. The modulators were structured as symmetric Mach–Zehnder interferometers, which were inherently insensitive to temperature and wavelength. The phase shifters composed of p-i-n diodes were stable against temperature change under a constant bias-current condition. The PD photocurrent was also temperature insensitive, and the photo-to-dark current ratio was higher than 30 dB up to 100 °C. We achieved error-free data links at 20 Gbps and a high bandwidth density of 19 Tbps/cm2 operating up to 125 °C without adjusting the LDs, modulators, or PDs. The interposers are tolerant of the heat generated by the mounted LSIs and usable over the extended industrial temperature range without complex monitoring or feedback controls. The bandwidth density is sufficient for the needs of the late 2010s.

© 2014 IEEE

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