Abstract

The understanding and development of 160-Gb/s transmission systems requires the study of the impact of different dispersion compensation schemes on pulse propagation in nonlinear fiber. In this paper, we present an investigation of 160-Gb/s optical transmission systems, focusing on optimal propagation regimes, and in particular, we analyze different transmission limitations and dominant nonlinear effects by comparing quasi-linear and dispersion managed soliton systems. Two quasi-linear systems, one using nonzero dispersion-shifted fiber (NZDSF) and the other single-mode fiber (SMF), and one short-period (1 km) dispersion managed soliton (DMS) system are studied, both for single-channel and wavelength-division-multiplexed (WDM) transmission. First, the performance of the two quasi-linear systems in single-channel transmission are compared and it is shown that the NZDSF and SMF systems allow similar error-free transmission distances with only small differences in the intrachannel four-wave mixing (IFWM) induced amplitude jitter. The effect of pulsewidth on transmission performance in this regime was investigated and the use of shorter pulses was found to result in lower amplitude jitter. We analyzed the behavior of the DMS system and showed that the reduced pulse broadening during transmission allowed a significantly longer single-channel transmission distance with a smaller impact of nonlinearities compared to quasi-linear propagation. The sensitivity of the DMS system performance to statistical fluctuations in the fiber dispersion was studied and the results show the level of accuracy in the dispersion management map which must be ensured in these systems. Finally,the performance of the DMS in WDM transmission was investigated and it was found that it was subject to very large penalties increasing the minimum channel spacing possible because of the strong impact of interchannel cross-phase modulation (XPM).

© 2004 IEEE

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