Abstract

In aerial photography the airplane’s ground speed introduces image movement during the exposure. To reduce its influence on the image quality, it is possible to apply a shorter exposure time but only at the cost of using a more sensitive film. This introduces a higher granularity and, because most details are of low contrast, another reduction of the image quality. Obviously, there is an optimum choice for any particular situation. A fast analysis of such problems is carried out on the “ITC Modulation Transfer Board”. From the modulation transfer functions of lens, emulsion, and image movement, together with other data, the smallest detail visible is determined. The Systems Engineering shows that the higher MTF does not necessarily correspond to the best choice of parameters. This paradox can be understood only by considering the granularity of the films used.

© 1964 Optical Society of America

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