Abstract

In advanced biomedicine and microfluidics, there is a strong desire to sort and manipulate various cells and bacteria based on miniaturized microfluidic chips. Here, by integrating fiber tweezers into a T-type microfluidic channel, we report an optofluidic chip to selectively trap Escherichia coli in human blood solution based on different sizes and shapes. Furthermore, we simulate the trapping and pushing regions of other cells and bacteria, including rod-shaped bacteria, sphere-shaped bacteria, and cancer cells based on finite-difference analysis. With the advantages of controllability, low optical power, and compact construction, the strategy may be possibly applied in the fields of optical separation, cell transportation, and water quality analysis.

© 2019 Optical Society of America

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Supplementary Material (3)

NameDescription
» Visualization 1       E. coli cells were trapped while red blood cells were pushed by optical force.
» Visualization 2       E. coli chain was delivered in −x direction and +y direction by moving the optical fiber.
» Visualization 3       E. coli cells were released by turning off the laser and flowed into the outlet by DI water flow.

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