Abstract

A rigorous electromagnetic analysis method, using a 4 × 4 matrix formulation in combination with discrete Fourier-transform techniques, is presented as a straightforward way of analyzing the optical transmission and reflection characteristics of anisotropic multilayered structures. Three examples illustrating the method are presented. First, the previous ellipsometric and polarimetric work of Zander et al. [ Optik 70, 6 ( 1985)] is extended to cases in which coupling between orthogonally polarized plane waves exists at interfaces. Second, Williamson’s multiple-pass birefringent spectral filter [ J. Opt. Soc. Am. 61, 767 ( 1971)] is reevaluated; results including and excluding interference effects are presented. Third, the design of a new, very-narrow-band (typically 0.01 nm), tunable spectral filter called the Fabry–Perot/Šolc filter is introduced. Several versions of the Fabry–Perot/Šolc filter, each employing different materials, are analyzed. One version exhibits a total tuning range of 40 nm, and another version has an effective finesse of approximately 1300.

© 1987 Optical Society of America

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