Abstract

Common-path digital in-line holography is considered as a valuable 3D diagnostic technique for a wide range of applications. This configuration is cost effective and relatively immune to variation in the experimental environment. Nevertheless, due to its common-path geometry, the signal-to-noise ratio of the acquired hologram is weak as most of the detector (i.e., CCD/CMOS sensor) dynamics are occupied by the reference field signal, whose energy is orders of magnitude higher than the field scattered by the imaged object. As it is intrinsically impossible to modify the ratio of energy of reference to the object field, we propose a co-design approach (optics/data processing) to tackle this issue. The reference to the object field ratio is adjusted by adding a 4-f device to a conventional in-line holographic setup, making it possible to reduce the weight of the reference field while keeping the object field almost constant. Theoretical analysis of the Crámer–Rao lower bounds of the corresponding imaging model illustrates the advantages of this approach. These lower bounds can be asymptotically reached using a parametric inverse problem reconstruction. This implementation results in a 60% gain in axial localization accuracy (for 100 μm diameter spherical objects) compared to a classical in-line holography setup.

© 2015 Optical Society of America

Full Article  |  PDF Article
OSA Recommended Articles
On the single point resolution of on-axis digital holography

Corinne Fournier, Loïc Denis, and Thierry Fournel
J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 27(8) 1856-1862 (2010)

Improved depth resolution by single-exposure in-line compressive holography

Yair Rivenson, Adrian Stern, and Bahram Javidi
Appl. Opt. 52(1) A223-A231 (2013)

Pixel super-resolution in digital holography by regularized reconstruction

C. Fournier, F. Jolivet, L. Denis, N. Verrier, E. Thiebaut, C. Allier, and T. Fournel
Appl. Opt. 56(1) 69-77 (2017)

References

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Citation lists with outbound citation links are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Cited By

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Cited by links are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Figures (9)

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Figure files are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Tables (1)

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Article tables are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Equations (42)

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Equations are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Metrics

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Article level metrics are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription