Abstract

Some investigators have suggested that the distinctness of chromatic borders (i.e., borders visible in photic arrays of uniform luminance) can be used as an index of hue and saturation differences between lights. However, recent evidence indicates that only two types of cones in the trichromatic eye contribute to chromatic border perception. A series of experiments are reported that were designed to discriminate between these alternatives, utilizing mainly the short-wavelength visible spectrum. The results support the notion that only R and G cones in the trichromatic eye mediate the perception of chromatic borders; thus the distinctness of such borders alone cannot be used as an index of either hue or saturation differences, because both of these aspects of color involve contributions from B cones.

© 1979 Optical Society of America

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