Abstract

One of the major problems of television development has been that of obtaining adequate brightness in the reproduced picture, particularly in the case of the projection receiver where large pictures are desired. Directional projection screens which concentrate the available light into the desired viewing field are an important aid in overcoming this difficulty. Although various directional screens have been proposed, the primary question always has been: How could a high quality screen be made at a cost that would permit its use in home projection receivers? This paper presents a study of the factors governing the design of projection screens for home television receivers and describes an improved laminated-plastic screen which provides a brightness gain of 7.5 without perceptible “hot-spot.” If the viewing field is defined as that zone in which the brightness exceeds half the maximum value, it provides a vertical field of ±10 degrees and a horizontal field of ±25 degrees. In combination with large aperture, reflective optics it gives a 15- by 20-inch picture having highlights with a brightness of more than 75 footlamberts. This compares favorably with the highlight brightness obtained with direct-viewing kinescopes and more than satisfies the recommendations for good motion picture theater practice.

© 1948 Optical Society of America

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