Abstract

The relative range performance of approximately 80 telescopic systems of 18 different designs has been determined by statistical methods based on the results of a field test conducted from shipboard. The range at which objects are detectable from aboard ship is compared with the range computed from laboratory measurements of light transmission, magnification, exit pupil, and contrast rendition, using a method described by Hardy and the data of Duntley and Blackwell on the characteristics of the atmosphere and the human eye. The agreement between the results of the field tests and the computations is extraordinary. This is interpreted to mean that the most important factors were taken into account in both the statistical and computational procedures. This implies that if a visibility field test is properly conducted, the results can be expected to agree with those of simulated laboratory tests, and conversely, that properly constructed laboratory tests will yield data which predict accurately the performance of instruments in the field.

© 1948 Optical Society of America

Full Article  |  PDF Article
OSA Recommended Articles
Stray Light in Optical Systems*

Howard S. Coleman
J. Opt. Soc. Am. 37(6) 434-451 (1947)

A Method for Making Precise Resolution Measurements*

Howard S. Coleman and Samuel W. Harding
J. Opt. Soc. Am. 37(4) 263-271 (1947)

A Method of Measuring the Contrast Rendition of Telescopic Systems*

Howard S. Coleman, George W. Arnold, and Walter D. Luedecke
J. Opt. Soc. Am. 39(10) 864-869 (1949)

References

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Citation lists with outbound citation links are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Cited By

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Cited by links are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Tables (9)

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Article tables are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Equations (1)

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Equations are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription