Abstract

Radiant fluorescent intensity, from a UV irradiated sample of crude oil in the visible spectral region, was measured as a function of exposure time of the crude oil to the atmosphere. The intensity of the laboratory source of UV irradiation (300–400 nm) was calibrated and compared with the intensity of the sun at sea level through 1 atm. The maximum intensity of the sun excited fluorescence was estimated to be 5 times less than that required to be detected by presently available satellite mounted visible spectrum detectors and 500 times less than that required to differentiate one crude oil type from another.

© 1985 Optical Society of America

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